Let me tell you something: you’re not agile. You pretended to be a scrum team; you performed all of the rituals (standup, demo, and retrospective); and you acquired all of the necessary tools (JIRA, user stories, and a scrum board). However, if the mindset is wrong, there is still something essentially missing. This is why:

You have a detailed plan. - To put it another way, you have a strict deadline for the entire year. The scrum team calculates velocity based on estimations made during sprint planning. How can you assess if the scrum team can deliver according to top management’s best guess? If the roadmap is rigid, the scope is fixed, and the release plan is unrealistic, it is a waterfall approach.

You don’t have a scrum master on your team. - You have one in your organization chart, but what exactly is his job title? He’s probably not a full-time scrum master but rather a project manager, product owner, or senior developer who isn’t fully committed to the role. When the scrum master is also the developer and product owner, things start to go awry. Even if you have a scrum master, it’s unlikely that he’ll be able to tackle true barriers because the problem is either too technical or above his job title’s ability to fix all dependencies.

There is no one in charge of your product - It’s a big job, but he’s generally too preoccupied with getting it perfect. The backlog needs to be prioritized. When there is no vision, when the requirements come from other external senior directors, and when the features developed would be wasted, each narrative is equally significant. The product owner is in charge of the decision, but few people are willing to take the risk, and many are unsure of what they want.

You don’t have a spending plan - Story point is not a budgeting tool. It can no longer reflect the team’s actual velocity because you overestimate for more money and buffer time, or during negotiations, for story points to decrease the budget. Meanwhile, traditional accounting methods are unsuitable for agile. Money is the root of all evil when burning out the scrum team while failing to get the desired outcome.

Manifesto in my own words - Response to change over following a strict roadmap from senior management. Individuals and interaction over office politics.Working software over long hours of pointless meetings. Customer negotiations over budget negotiation. That is not simple to accomplish, but it is the only way for a bureaucratic organization to thrive in the digital age.