Dear Hong Kong friends, your terror is palpable to me. My heart bled when I saw the blood flowing from your wounds; these were caused by bashing and beating. However, I empathise with what you did. I understand another’ feelings and suffering as human beings. We used to have freedom of speech and could express our diverse viewpoints through the media. But now, this is the darkest era in Hong Kong with all the restrictions.

The government recently shut down Apple Daily because it could not accept differing viewpoints. Key opinion leaders who disagree with the constitution begin to give up and stop commenting. The sense of powerlessness, the analysis of the political context, and their proposals were all ineffective in preventing the situation from worsening day by day.

More importantly, fear paralyzes us since anyone could face legal consequences if they break the national security statute. You are not required to speak out or write anything incorrectly. The police must show that you want to endanger the country’s security. However, the law is on their side, and they may be able to put you in jail without a trial. You must be cautious since they may search your WhatsApp and other social media accounts to escalate the situation.

Is this what Hong Kong wants? Do we want to live under a dictatorship? Do we want a government that includes members of the opposition in the Legislative Council?

They want to instil fear in you so that you won’t share your opinions. Do you, on the other hand, know what the tyrant is scared of? Yes, it is your suggestion. The dictator is terrified of your opposing views. He is worried about your publications, public speaking, and even the colour of your T-shirt, which should be black.

Your idea has greater potential to spread and influence the world than a tank or gun. I’m not strong enough to fight in a war or obtain the necessary tools to defend myself. With the transition of government leaders, Hong Kong is fast becoming a police state. However, we must fight this battle to safeguard our principles and ideals. We feel terrified in the presence of the dictator, yet we identify with Hong Kongers who are willing to fight in prison.

We sympathize with the imprisoned Hong Kongers. Unfortunately, there are currently no simple or rapid answers to all of the issues. An article or a speech could urge for quick enlightenment and provide temporary remedies to our problems.

Many books and YouTube videos on the Internet provide us with information and enlightenment. In Hong Kong, we couldn’t use a local perspective to assess the issue. Instead, we must consider the situation from a global perspective, with a historical horizon in mind, and thoroughly comprehend the nature of the communist party, which has remained unchanged beneath the surface. They want power, a cultural revolution, a dictator’s bad decisions that result in millions of innocent people dying of famine, the abolition of Confucius and the moral system, and so on. All of these things are true, regardless of how the political establishment tries to alter history.

Reading books can be beneficial to one’s health. History’s lessons, the fight for democracy, and old philosophers’ teachings all have a psychological and cognitive therapy component. They assist us in dealing with the uncertainty that lies ahead of us and the impending political upheaval that will impact all of our lives.

Hong Kongers’ survival is dependent on their thoughts and ideas. They are spontaneous reactions to news and government policies that contradict our beliefs. That is why freedom of expression is critical to keep everyone’s mind open to new ideas and perspectives. The dictator can silence us, but he can’t make us change our minds. Humans make decisions based on their pre-existing beliefs and how they interpret their experiences. You couldn’t force people to believe something they didn’t want to believe, and you couldn’t violate Hong Kongers’ essential values of democracy, freedom, and justice. The greater the power, the greater the resistance. Putting nonviolent demonstrators in jail is brutal, and our empathy for them helps us overcome our fear and combat tyranny.

Being compassionate does not necessitate a higher education degree. To understand the ethical choice you must make, you do not need to read many books. What took place in Yuen Long? Did we know about gangsters and cops working together? Was it justified for the police’s use of excessive force against the protesters? Were all of these activities moral or immoral?

Different political perspectives are represented by blue and yellow, while black and white represent consciousness and distinguish between right and wrong. I understand the anguish of nonviolent protestors. The gangsters and cops beat them. It is a key juncture in history, and I urge everyone to know what is going on.

As Hong Kong residents, it is our responsibility to use the power of words to communicate our opinions. We must continue to reveal the truth so that future generations can comprehend the dictator’s wicked deeds. We will never forget the truth and all the awful things they did to gain power, no matter how hard the dictator tried to brainwash everyone into believing in his greatness.

We’ll use words to preserve a record and convey our ideas in the hopes that someone in the future will be able to read and comprehend what we’ve written. As a result, reading literature is our obligation as intellectuals, not only for gaining knowledge but also for understanding what is going on in our society.

Although many writers are subjected to national security laws, your notion in an article is like a spark that could spread, encouraging others to be brave and conquer their fears. Your well-structured piece, complete with a clear message and motivational speech, has the potential to encourage all Hong Kong residents who feel powerless. Your narrative, no matter how insignificant, has the potential to have an influence. Humans have sympathy, which makes them want to listen, pay attention, and try to comprehend. Please don’t underestimate the power of words, as they are our last line of defence in this war.